Behavior and Training

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How to Help With Escape Behaviors

Some dogs are professional escape artists. This behavior can be a huge risk to their safety. Escape behaviors can start due to a variety of reasons but are often a result of opportunity and boredom. If you have a dog that has already learned to escape yards or door dash please follow the tips below! 

How to Help With Resource Guarding

Resource guarding is a term used to describe a dog concerned about others (people or animals) taking away items he values such as food, treats, toys, or even a favorite spot. This can look like a dog standing frozen over his item of choice, running away with his treasure, growling, or even snapping and biting. This behavior can be managed and a training plan set in place so that everyone in the household can interact safely in a stress-free way.

Helping Your Leash Reactive Dog

Some dogs growl, bark, or lunge when they see other dogs while on a leash. Dogs may do this because they are fearful of the other dog, or they may be overly excited by other dogs and frustrated that they cannot approach. This behavior can be modified and is often best done with the support of a certified positive reinforcement trainer.

What To Do

 

Introducing Your Dog to Resident Pets

Introducing a new dog into your household is exciting! It’s also a very stressful transition for your new family member and a big change for resident pets. A slow introduction can help you avoid conflict. Follow the steps below to set your animals up for success.

What To Do

  • Allow Your New Dog to Decompress: As your new dog settles in, create a safe comfortable place in your home where he can eat, drink, and relax. Do not let your other pets bother him while he is in this area.

How to Help Your Fearful Dog

Dogs can be fearful for a variety of reasons including a lack of socialization, scary experiences in their past, and/or genetics. Whatever the reason for their fear, there are steps you can take to ensure that you recognize when they are afraid and then to help them feel safe and secure.

Your dog can have different ways to tell you that they are feeling uncomfortable or afraid. The signs may be subtle, but it is important for you to recognize your dog’s body language as soon as possible and intervene.  

Recognize Fearful Body language 

How to Help with Jumping

Jumping is a natural dog behavior. They may be trying to say hi or just too excited to contain themselves. This is especially common in young, energetic dogs that may not have had much training. This behavior can be very frustrating and even sometimes painful to live with. The good news is, there are plenty of ways to help your new family member learn better ways to greet people. 

 

What To Do

  • Prevent the behavior. Use baby gates or a leash to contain your dog in situations where you know he is likely to jump. 

Play Biting and Chewing in Puppies and Dogs

Dogs explore the world with their mouths. Chewing is a natural behavior that can be exacerbated due to teething or boredom. Dogs can also learn that it is fun to grab people with their mouths in excitement or play. This is especially common in young, energetic dogs that may not have had much training. This behavior can be very frustrating and even sometimes painful to live with. The good news is, there are plenty of ways to help your new family member direct their urge to use their mouth to appropriate items. 

 

What To Do

How to Help With Separation Distress

Some dogs experience anxiety when left alone. When the behavior is due to an adjustment to his new home or boredom, providing mental stimulation and exercise will often resolve the issues. In the case of true separation anxiety, this is a panic disorder that will require support. 

 

If most, or all, of the following statements are true, he may have separation anxiety

  • The behavior occurs exclusively when he’s left alone.